Category Archives: Homegoing of a Saint

Homegoing of a Saint – Dr. Curtis Raines, Sr., Macon, GA

From http://www.macon.com/2015/02/21/3598890_prominent-macon-pastor-dies.html?rh=1, February 21, 2015

Dr. Curtis Raines Sr., a Macon pastor who led a large state organization for black churches, died Saturday. He was 67.

Raines was pastor of New Pilgrim Missionary Baptist Church in Macon and was president of the General Missionary Baptist Convention of Georgia. According to the group’s website, the convention is the largest black organization of any kind in Georgia.

Henry Ficklin, a former Macon city councilman, knew Raines for 40 years.

“I think anyone who knew him will remember him for his wonderful deeds,” Ficklin said.

Bibb County Coroner Leon Jones said Raines was pronounced dead at Medical Center, Navicent Health, of an undisclosed illness. Jones knew Raines well, and remembered going to New Pilgrim many years ago when it was much smaller.

“He was a good person,” Jones said. “He was a person who thought community and he was a leader. That church came a long way.”

Ficklin said New Pilgrim has more than 700 members today. According to the church’s website, Raines served as pastor since shortly after it was founded in 1981 with 33 members. He was named president of the state convention in 2012, Ficklin said. Raines also pastored Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Monroe County.

Ficklin said Raines died of “complications.” He said Raines had survived a kidney transplant, prostate cancer, heart bypass and back surgery.

“God had delivered him from a lot of things,” Ficklin said.

Bentley & Sons Funeral Home has charge of the arrangements, which have not been set.

Homegoing of a Saint: Dr. George Moore, Atlanta, Georgia

From the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, February 13, 2015

ATLANTA – George Moore was a jovial, humble pastor who spoke with purpose.

“He believed in what I was doing and encouraged me to be the best at what I was doing,” said his son George Moore Jr.

A Decatur native, Moore began working at age 9 as a delivery boy for a local drug store. He graduated from Atlanta’s Washington High School and went on to work for several restaurants including Lucas’ Grille in Atlanta. He co-owned the clothing boutique Vine City Village and became a driver for one of the first black-owned cab companies, The Atlanta Car for Hire. He eventually became part owner.

George Moore, 79: Pastor saw church membership reach 10,000 photo

Moore went to church with his grandfather and joined Cosmopolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1951.

“He became so attached and interested in the life of the church,” said his son. “One day the Lord called him to preach while he was a member of Cosmopolitan AME Church.”

Moore attended Turner Theological Seminary at Morris Brown College. He was ordained a deacon in 1958 and ordained an itinerant elder in the AME Church in 1960.

He was appointed the pastor of Woosley Mission AME Church in November of 1958 and Davis Chapel AME Church in November of 1961. In July 1962, he was appointed to Amanda Flipper AME Church, where he served for eight years.

In 1970, Moore was appointed to Saint Philip AME Church in the Reynoldstown community, and he moved the membership of 200 to its current location in 1977. The membership has since grown to more than 10,000, and the church has more than 50 ministries. He served as senior pastor for more than 42 years.

George Moore died Sunday. He was 79. A funeral will be held 10:45 a.m. Saturday at Saint Philip AME Church, 240 Candler Road SE, Atlanta. Gregory B. Levett & Sons is in charge of arrangements.

“He knew how to encourage and lift you up,” said Kevin Moore, his grandson. “He would always tell me, ‘I am encouraged just because you showed up. I love you just for being you.’ It means a lot for someone to believe in your gifts more than you do. He was always behind me saying ‘you can do it, you got it.’ ”

Moore received honorary doctoral degrees from Wilberforce University in Ohio, Morris Brown College and Turner Theological Seminary.

His grandson said Moore liked to help younger pastors. In 2002, Moore and his family established the George Moore Foundation, which provides mentoring for men and women in ministry and their spouses.

In addition to his son and grandson, Moore is survived by his wife Nettie Mae Lewis-Moore, daughter L’Tanya Moore-Copeland, daughter L’Tarra Moore, four grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

Homegoing of a Saint: Dr. Joseph Roberts, Atlanta, Georgia

From the Atlanta Journal Constitution:

ATLANTA, GA – Handpicked by the Rev. Martin Luther King Sr., Joseph Roberts led Ebenezer Baptist Church as its pastor for 30 years. Roberts died Sunday. He was 79.

Born in Chicago, Roberts attended that city’s public schools throughout his childhood and graduated from Knoxville College in 1956. He received a Masters of Divinity from the Union Theological Seminary in New York City in the 1960s. He then attended Princeton Theological Seminary, where he earned a Masters of Theology.

In the early 1970s, Roberts became senior pastor of the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church. Under Roberts’ leadership, more than 2,000 members were added to the congregation. He launched a community outreach program that included the Teenage Mothers Ministry, tutoring and counseling programs, a food co-op, and a daycare center for older adults.

Roberts envisioned a new sanctuary for the growing membership. In 1999, the building of the Horizon Sanctuary was completed. The 32,000-square-foot sanctuary seats 2,446 people.

He was a recipient of awards from Union Theological Seminary and Princeton Theological Seminary. In 2006, Roberts published a collection of sermons titled “Sideswiped by Eternity: Sermons from Ebenezer Baptist Church.”

Homegoing of a Saint: Rev. Alonzo Twitty, Sr., Albuquerque, NM

by Robert Earl Houston

One of the legends of Albuquerque, New Mexico has been called home to be with the Lord. Below is the obituary provided by the Daniels Funeral Home:

Alonzo Twitty, Sr., age eighty-five (85) was born February 29, 1929 to the late Mr. Albert Twitty and Mrs. Viola Dixon-Twitty on the Ward Morn farm in Brazos County, better known as Brazos Bottom located ten miles outside of Bryan and College Station, Texas, one of eleven children. He departed this life at a local hospital on Saturday, January 3, 2015. He is preceded in death by his parents; brothers Albert, John D, Napoleon, Grant; sisters Annie Mae, Frances, Estelle, Othell, Loraine, and Jewel Lee; daughter Linda Kay Hopkins-Twitty; son John Jeff Twitty I, and granddaughter Shavon Earl Twitty.
Reverend Twitty accepted Christ at an early age and was a member of the Salem Baptist church. Although called to the ministry at the age of five, he did not accept the call until the age of thirty-one and was ordained at the age of forty at the Antioch Baptist Church by the late Dr. James A. Hopkins, former pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church, the late Dr. W.W Williams, former pastor of Macedonia Baptist Church, the late Reverend Walter Green, former pastor of St. Luke Baptist Church and the late Dr. C. Trotter, former pastor of Mt. Olive Baptist Church. He focused on a dream that became a reality and in 1970 he organized the Pilgrim Rest Missionary Baptist Church, Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he pastored faithfully for 44 years. He was a member of the National Baptist Conference of America, USA Inc., the Baptist Ministers Union, Ministers Fellowship Alliance, the Progressive Missionary Baptist State Convention of Central Arizona and New Mexico and the Saint Luke District Association.
He received his early school education from Salem Elementary and attended High School at Fair View High School. After moving to Albuquerque he completed his education and received his High School Diploma from Albuquerque High. At the age of eighteen, he enlisted in the Unites States Army, where he served for two years, with his basic training in Camp Rucker Alabama he then went to Germany and stayed 18 months. After relief from the army he met and married his sweetheart of 62 years, Edna Earl Walton. He then spent twenty-two years in the Army Reserve, which allowed him an opportunity to travel the world.
He became a certified Pastoral Counselor by the Institute of Pastoral Counselor Division of Universal bible institute in 1977; earned a Bachelor’s, Master of Arts Degree in Religious Education from the World Institute of Religious Education, Farmington, New Mexico in 1983. In 2012 he received his Doctorate in Religious Education, from the World Institute of Religious Education.
Rev. Twitty loved to sing and in 1968 he formed his own singing group known as the Twitty Family, who sung all over the state of New Mexico, Texas, Arizona and Virginia. During their singing tour he and his family recorded two records, which include My Life Is in God’s Hand, Old Ship of Zion, Somewhere Around God’s Throne, and Any How My Lord. Where ever you would see Rev. Twitty he had a smile on his face and a song in his heart. His theme song that he carried with him for many years is “I know my life is in God’s hand”, of which he was able to place his life stories in the book that he Authored called Free Grace, “My Life in God’s Hand in 2009.
Reverend Twitty received numerous accolades in appreciation for his distinguished and invaluable service, support and contributions to the communities of Albuquerque, Belen, and Rio rancho, New Mexico. He received special honors from Kirtland Air Force Base, Lacy Kirk Williams Institution, Dallas Texas, Albuquerque Black Economic League, National Baptist Congress of Christian Workers, and Baptist Ministers in appreciation for outstanding service and community development. He was a recipient of the Living Legend Award in 2008 and the Community Service award from the Grant Chapel AME Church Lay Organization-Dr. Martin Luther King.
On the 23rd day of May, 1953, he married Edna Earl Walton and to this union they were blessed with eleven children. He is survived as follows wife, daughters Vivian Jean, Edna Jewel Whitaker (husband Fredrick), Annie Marie Miller, Sheniqua Shanae, daughter-in-law JoAnn Lackey; sons Alonzo, Jr. (wife Diane), Donald Ray, Sr. (wife Sandra D.), Jeremiah Guy (wife Roberta), Isaiah Matthews., and Brian Moses all of Albuquerque. Sixty-eight grand, great-grand and great-great grandchildren and now in the fifth generation; grandchildren include, Veronica, Dee Ann, Louis, Adrian, Tasha, Ariel, Jordan, Chrystal, Briana, Jackie, Don Jr, Tiffany, Moniqua (husband Kenneth), Henry (wife Patricia), Jeannette (Jason), Queannette, Apollonia,(husband Kharia), Allonnia (husband Marcus), Leanne, Amanda (husband , John Jeff II, Lamar, Jeremiah Jr, Tierre; and a host of loving cousins, nieces, nephews and friends.
He was a pastor, daddy, husband, grandpa, brother, uncle, cousin and friend. He enjoyed spending time with his family and friends. Rev. Twitty was well known and loved throughout the various Communities of Albuquerque and Vicinity and across the nation. Pastor Twitty was loved by all who came in contact with him and never met a stranger. He was always dedicated to assisting those in need, reaching the unchurched, and enlightening believers to receive all God has promised, including healing, deliverance, and the fullness of God’s spirit. He was devoted to community service, brotherly love and a “friend” to all who knew him. He was a man called, anointed and appointed by God, he trusted in the Lord and never wavered in his faith. He will be missed by many for years to come, but his spirit will live within each and every person whose lives he touched with his selfless giving, compassion and strong faith and spirit. The family would like to thank the hardworking staff at the New Mexico VA Health Care Services for their compassionate love and care, the Ministers Fellowship, and a special to Bishop Shelby and God’s House and Rev. Darnell Smith and the Macedonia Baptist Church.
The services will be as follows, there will be a private family viewing on Friday, January 9, 2015 from 10-12 at Pilgrim Rest Missionary Baptist Church, 315 53rd Street, Albuquerque, NM 87105, following this there will be a visitation from 12 p.m.-7:30 p.m., with a service immediately following the viewing from 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Funeral services will be Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. at God’s House, with internment to follow at Fairview Cemetery. Pallbearers: Kharia Jordan, Robert Jordan, Adrian Twitty, Marcus Cook II, Jordan Johns, Jason Hobbs, Jason Quiniones, Donald Twitty, Jr., Honorary Pallbearers: Alonzo Twitty, Jr., Donald Twitty, Sr., Jeremiah Guy Twitty, Sr., Isaiah Twitty, Alonzo Lamar, Fredrick Whitaker, Brian Twitty, Jeremiah Twitty, Jr., John Jeff II, Jaylen Quiniones, Christopher Romero.

Homegoing of a Saint – Rev. H. David Parker, Baltimore, MD

From http://www.newsday.com . . . January 7, 2015

The Rev. H. David Parker, who spent 20 years in the nation’s military before becoming pastor of Emanuel Baptist Church in Elmont for 45 years, died Saturday of a heart attack at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He was 93.

Parker, who was drafted into the Army in 1942, was the nation’s youngest regimental sergeant-major when, in 1943, he attained that rank at age 21, his family said.

After serving in England, France, the Philippines and Okinawa, Japan, he returned to the states, serving at Fort Benning, Georgia, until he was honorably discharged in October 1948.

That December, he enlisted in the Air Force, where he would serve in the United States and overseas until retiring in October 1962.

He was the recipient of more than a dozen military awards, including the Commendation Medal for meritorious service. He was assigned to Mitchel Air Force Base in Hempstead in 1952 and married Willie Mae Bates of Hempstead in 1953. They had six children. She died in June 1987.

In those last military years, while stationed at Mitchel Field, Parker joined the Antioch Baptist Church in Hempstead and there became the Eastern Baptist Association of New York’s first ordained assistant pastor, said Antioch’s current pastor, Bishop Phillip Elliott.

He said Parker was the first Nassau resident to be the association’s moderator, or leader, serving from 1976 to 1980. The association covers Long Island, Brooklyn and Queens.

Parker came to Emanuel in 1963, when it had about 60 members. He was its fifth pastor. When he retired in 2008, the church had more than 700 members.

In 1972, Parker founded and organized the Nassau Council of Black Clergy.

In 1992 he became an area vice president for the Empire Baptist Missionary Convention. In 1994, he was appointed ambassador to the United Nations for the National Baptist Convention USA Inc.

In 1979, he was appointed chairman of the Nassau County Interracial Task Force by County Executive Fran Purcell. Parker also served for 16 years on the Nassau County Human Rights Commission.

Former Hempstead Mayor James Garner extolled Parker as a man who believed in doing the right thing all the time. “He was a role model that I only hoped to emulate,” he said.

Survivors include wife Flora Covington Parker of Baltimore; four daughters, Wanda K. Parker of Hempstead, Helen M. Kennedy of Fort Lauderdale, Joyce A. Parker of Topeka, Kansas, and Dorothy J. Parker-Guana of Amityville; two sons, David K. Parker of Chicago and Daniel K. Parker of Atlanta; three sisters, Alma Bowie of Anniston, Alabama, Ruth Parker of Clanton, Alabama, and Ethel Carr of Dayton, Ohio; 14 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren.

The wake is from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday, January 12, 2015 at Emanuel Baptist Church in Elmont. The service will be there at 10 a.m. Tuesday, January 13, 2015. Burial will follow at Greenfield Cemetery in Uniondale.

He Left Us To See The King – Homegoing of a Saint: Andrae Crouch

by Robert Earl Houston

This evening (January 8, 2015) the body of Christ lost its metronome. Pastor Andrae Crouch went home to be with the Lord at the age of 72 in Southern California.

If you were in Choirs or a musician (or a budding musician as I was in the 1970s) your world was turned upside down by the persona of Andrae Crouch. He was so different from the rest of the crowd. James Cleveland, Clay Evans, Thomas Whitfield, and others who were “church” – with suits and ties and minimal instrumentation, and along comes a hip, cool brother – wearing open collars, hats, bell bottom slacks, with piano, organ (Billy Preston was his organist), drums, bass, and literally ignited a debate about what was and wasn’t gospel music. He took it to a dimension the church had never seen before.

He made gospel music available to everyone. I was reading through Twitter tonight and struck by the color of the voices that commented on his death. Theologians praised him for his accuracy of lyrics. Current songwriters and gospel artists have laid great accolades upon him.

Andrae Crouch was never a gospel artist. He was a brother who loved God, without saying it proved that you didn’t have to be completely clean cut to serve God, that your appearance did not speak to your destiny, and that young people had a place in sharing the gospel even through song. He was too cool to be called an artist – that term could not adequately describe what Andrae Crouch was to the church.

What struck me was how he conquered life issues and did not allow them to stop him from serving God. He not only followed the beat from a different drum – he changed the beat. He rejected the notion that God could not use certain persons even as he struggled with dyslexia.  He and his sister picked up the mantle of their parents’ church and it flourished by loving people.

I’m amazed that in his very young years he wrote “The Blood Will Never Lose His Power,”  He actually penned for James Cleveland, “Can’t Nobody Do Me Like Jesus.” He wrote the songs of the church – and as a musician I appreciated that what he recorded, you could play. His recordings were crystal clear and you could write the lyrics with ease.

Man, he wrote and/or recorded songs like  “Jesus is Lord,” “I Will Bless the Lord,” “Tell Them,” “My Tribute (To God Be The Glory),” “Take Me Back,” “Jesus Is The Answer,””Through It All,””The Broken Vessel,” “It’s Gonna Rain,””I Don’t Know Why Jesus Loves Me,” up to his recent anthem for the Church, “Let the Church Say Amen.”

In an era of people who record gospel music for the sake of money and fame, Andrae Crouch is a great reminder that serving the Lord will pay off. He yielded himself to Him and the Lord blessed him tremendously. He changed COGICs, Baptists, Methodists, Whites, Blacks, Educated, Educators and Common People with the stroke of a pen.

Certainly we pray for his sister, the Crouch Family, and their church in Southern California. Thank you Andrae for demonstrating that you don’t need a title to be substantive.

Homegoing of a Saint – Rev. Michael C. Murphy, Washington, DC

From the Washington Post
by Hamil R. Harris

WASHINGTON, DC – Rev. Michael C. Murphy, who served as the Senior Pastor of Peoples Congregational United Church of Christ for five years, died last Sunday just minutes before he was to deliver his morning sermon.

Rev. Leslie Dowdell-Cannon said church members found Murphy unconscious in his office before the start of the church’s early service.   She said members knocked on the door after he didn’t come to the pulpit for the 8:30 a.m. service. He was 62.

Church officials from the Central Atlantic Conference of the United Church of Christ have been told that Murphy died of an apparent heart attack and a spokesman for D.C.’s Office of the Chief Medical Examiner said Murphy was pronounced dead at a local hospital.

Rev. John Deckenback, conference minister for the Central Atlantic Conference of the United Church of Christ, said: “Michael was very important to the Central Atlantic Conference and the whole United Church of Christ family.

Murphy was a native of Chicago.  He graduated from DePaul University and  Michigan State University before enrolling in the Chicago Theological Seminary, where he earned a Masters of Divinity and a Doctorate in  Ministry.

In 1987, Murphy founded the St. Stephen’s Community Church in Lansing, Michigan. During his time there, he was also elected to the Lansing City Council and in 2000 he was elected to the Michigan State Legislature, where he served three terms. During his legislative tenure, he sponsored the Jasmine Miles School Children Safety Act, which was named after a student who died walking home from school in 2003. The legislation was aimed at getting local jurisdictions to add sidewalks, school crossings and to take other safety measures for school children crossing the street.

In 2009, Murphy  was “called,” by the leaders of Peoples Congregational United Church of Christ who had been looking for a pastor for two years after the retirement of Rev. Dr. A. Knighton Stanley, the church’s long time pastor. A church known for its focus on social justice issues, Peoples was founded by 175 people on March 6, 1891.

The church initially met in Nash Hall at 708 O Street  N.W. Washington, D.C.  In 1894, the first church building was built at 628 M Street N.W.   In April 1954,  the congregation conducted its first worship service at the current location at 4704 13th Street N.W. A new sanctuary was constructed at that location in 1991.

After becoming the pastor of Peoples,  Murphy emphasized hosting events like revival meetings as part of the church’s evangelistic outreach effort. The church has a proud legacy of spirituality, community service and social activism. The congregation is also home to a vibrant community of African American  middle class families.

“Looking back, moving forward and press on. That’s our theme,” said Murphy in an interview with the Post during the time.   “I see Peoples as a progressive Christian community, called by faith, led by hope and united by love to build strong committed disciples for Jesus Christ.”

Rev. Graylan Hagler, pastor of the Plymouth Congregational, called Murphy’s death, “a tremendous loss, Reverend Murphy was a very distinguished person in the UCC Movement and he was very engaged locally, regionally and nationally.”

Dowdell-Cannon said Murphy’s death is a blow to members of the United Church of Christ congregations nationwide.

“We had a lot of challenges at the church, but we managed to still talk, laugh and work together,” Dowdell-Cannon said. “My last conversation with him was that he was praying for me because my mother is ill.”

Murphy was divorced but he leaves behind a son and a daughter. Funeral arrangements were not immediately available.

Homegoing of a Saint – Dr. Johnnie Coleman, Chicago, Illinois

by Robert Earl Houston

Dr. Johnnie Coleman, the iconic Chicago minister who founded and built the Christ Universal Temple, for which she led for over 50 years, went home to be with the Lord on Tuesday, December 23, 2014.  Homegoing Services are pending and will be announced on the church website, http://www.cutemple.org.

The Church, now led by Rev. Derrick B. Wells, released the following statement:

On Tuesday, December 23rd, our beloved spiritual mother and founder, the Reverend Dr. Johnnie Colemon, made her transition. We lovingly hold her up in prayer as we release her into the grace, peace, and harmony of God’s presence.

We are praying with her family and everyone who was touched by her life-transforming ministry.

At this time, arrangements for a memorial service in her honor are incomplete.  Additional information will be forthcoming as promptly as it is made available.
From the Christ Universal Temple Website:

The Reverend Dr. Johnnie Colemon, often referred to as the First Lady of the New Thought Christian Community, founded Christ Universal Temple, a thriving, spirited, and progressive New Thought Church in 1956. In 1974, she established an international organization of affiliated New Thought churches and study groups called the Universal Foundation for Better Living.

As a member of the International New Thought Alliance (I.N.T.A.), Rev. Colemon served as the district president and the chairperson of the 60th I.N.T.A. Congress held in Chicago.

“Johnnie”, as Rev. Colemon is affectionately called, celebrated fifty years of building and teaching in 2006, the year she retired as the Senior Minister of Christ Universal Temple. During her tenure, she built five structures to spread the “Better Living” teachings, including three churches and two institutions of learning (Johnnie Colemon Institute and Johnnie Colemon Academy). She also constructed a luxury banquet hall and restaurant in service to a community that, previously, had little access to a high end dining experience. The first church, built in 1962, was named Christ Unity Temple, with a its addition to accommodate another 1000 parishioners constructed in 1972. When the congregation outgrew the first church and the additional building, Rev. Colemon designed, constructed, and moved into the current Christ Universal Temple, located on the 100 acre campus at 119th Street and Ashland Avenue in Chicago.

The Rev. Dr. Johnnie Colemon’s leadership, vision, and love continues to have an impact on a global scale as Christ Universal Temple remains a ‘Light Unto All Humanity.’

From: The History Makers

The Reverend Dr. Johnnie Colemon, founder-minister of Christ Universal Temple, has a message: “Teaching People How To Live Better Lives”. Often referred to as the first lady of America’s religious community, she is the pastor of the thriving, spirited and progressive New Thought Church, which has nearly 20,000 members. Born in Columbus, Mississippi, Colemon was raised in a rich spiritual environment. Her parents, John and Lula Haley, were active members of the church and encouraged their only child to participate. Colemon demonstrated leadership skills early at Union Academy High School, graduating as valedictorian of her class. She received her B.A. at Wiley College and first became a teacher for the Chicago Public Schools and later an analyst for the Quarter Masters.

Open Your Mind and Be Healed is not only the title of her book, but her remarkable personal story of the use of universal principles of healing. After learning that she had an incurable disease in 1952, with encouragement from her mother, Colemon enrolled in the Unity School of Christianity, Lee’s Summit, Missouri, where she received her teaching certificate and became an ordained minister.

Colemon is a builder and a teacher. She has built six structures to spread the better living teachings: three churches, two institutions of learning and a restaurant and banquet facility. The first church was Christ Unity Temple built in 1956 and its addition in 1973. The congregation expanded to the current Christ Universal Temple, located on the sprawling campus grounds at 119th Street (named Rev. Johnnie Colemon Drive in 1996) and Ashland Avenue in Chicago. Close to 4,000 people flock every Sunday and are taught how to think, rather than what to think. Her experiences compel her to share with others: “Change Your Thoughts and Change Your Life.” Out of a sense of knowing that a need for a vital, new affiliation of independent New Thought Churches existed, Colemon’s dynamic leadership led to the organization of the Universal Foundation for Better Living, Inc., an international association of New Thought Christian Churches and study groups located in the USA and abroad.

Her civic positions include Director of the Chicago Port Authority and Commissioner of the Chicago Transit Authority Oversight Committee, recognition as one of Chicago’s Living Legends by the Institute for African American Youth Development. She was honored by DuSable Museum as an African American History Maker.

Colemon is the recipient of numerous honors and awards. She holds the distinction of advancing the New Thought movement and received the Minister of the Century from the International New Thought Alliance (INTA). Colemon was awarded an honorary doctor of divinity degree from her alma mater, Wiley College in Wiley, Texas; the degrees of doctor of humane letters and doctor of divinity from Monrovia College, Liberia; and a Ph.D. in humane letters from Gospel Ministry Outreach (GMOR). Other honors include proclamations from the States of Illinois and Michigan; the City of Chicago; the Ohio House of Representatives; the Michigan Legislature; the City of Oakland, California; Miami, Florida and many others.

Homegoing of a Saint: Bishop Kenneth Lewis Tate, Huntsville, Alabama

June 1, 1960 – Dec. 16, 2014
Bishop Kenneth Lewis Tate, 54 of Huntsville, AL departed this life on December 16, 2014 at 9:34 am at his home surrounded by love.

Bishop Tate was educated in the Madison County school system, and attended Alabama A&M University, Huntsville, AL. He received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biblical Studies at American Baptist College, Nashville, TN. He retired from Redstone Arsenal as an Information Technology Specialist in 2004.

Bishop Kenneth Tate was the establisher, and Senior Pastor of New Shiloh Church Ministries in Huntsville, Alabama, and the Third Presiding Bishop of Dominion Covenant Fellowship of Churches, International; headquartered in Detroit, Michigan.

Bishop Tate leaves to mourn a wife, Cynthia Tate, Huntsville, AL; daughters, Angelia (Anthony) Huggins, Kenethia Tate, both of Huntsville, AL, son, Le’Quinton (Jimilee) Tate, Hazel Green, AL; mother, Alma J. Tate-Anderson, West Bloomfield, MI; father, Pastor Elijah (Lorine) Tate, Huntsville, AL; sister, Kabba Tate-Anderson, West Bloomfield; MI, four brothers, David (Valarie )Woods, Detroit, MI, Jarvis Tate, Huntsville, AL, Minister Christopher Tate, Johnson City, TN, Reverend Wayne Sibley, Huntsville, AL; step-sister, Alicia Burwell, Madison, AL, father and mother-in-law, Freddy and Vera Abernathy, Decatur, AL; three sisters-in-law, one brother-in-law, seven grandchildren, and a host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.

Visitation was held December 19, 2014, at New Shiloh Church Ministries (5101 Mastin Lake Road, Huntsville, AL). Funeral service was on Saturday, December 20, 2014, at Progressive Union Missionary Baptist Church (1919 Brandontown Road, Huntsville, AL) with Bishop James E. Kellem officiating. Interment will be in the Valhalla Memory Gardens. Bishop Tate will lie in repose one hour prior to funeral time. – See more at: http://obits.al.com/obituaries/huntsville/obituary.aspx?pid=173515375#sthash.hlZWYI3e.dpuf

Homegoing of a Saint – Dr. John T. Teabout, Sr., Newark, New Jersey

The Homegoing Services have been announced for Dr. John T. Teabout, Sr., pastor of the Greater Friendship Baptist Church Newark, NJ.

Rev. Teabout went home to be with our Lord and Savior on Friday, December 19, 2014.

Arrangements for his home-going services are as follow:

Wake:
Friday December 26, 2014 from 3 pm until
at Greater Friendship Baptist Church 84 Custer Ave, Newark, NJ

Home Going Service:
Saturday December 27, 2014 from 9 am until
at Zion Hill Baptist Church 152 Osborne Terrace, Newark, NJ

Rev. Teabout has been a faithful part of the Late Night Services for the National Baptist Convention. Let’s pray for his family and his church family and the community of faith.

THE WIRE

by Pastor Robert Earl Houston

H.B. Charles Jr.

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