Author Archive: Pastor Robert Earl Houston

Various Vacant Churches (September)

Attached is a list of pastoral position announcements for the following congregations:

Mount Calvary Missionary Baptist Church
Tucson, Arizona
Deadline: Not Listed

Calvary Baptist Church
Dover, Delaware
Deadline: November 30, 2016

Samaritan Baptist Church
Detroit, Michigan
Deadline: September 26, 2016

True Vine Baptist Church
Brandon, Mississippi
Deadline: September 30, 2016

Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
Sioux City, Iowa
Deadline: December 31, 2016

Avon Avenue Baptist Church
Cleveland, Ohio
Deadline: December 31, 2016

New Calvary Baptist Church
Detroit, Michigan
Deadline: October 31, 2016

Grace Temple Baptist Church
Lawn side, New Jersey
Deadline: September 30, 2016

St. John’s Baptist Church
Scotch Plains, New Jersey
Deadline: Not Listed

Please click on the link below for the PDF file:
vacant-churches-september

Youth & Young Adult Minister Position – Consolidated Baptist Church, Lexington, KY

Good afternoon Pastor Houston:

I would like to announce a new job opening for Youth and Young Adult Pastor with Consolidated Baptist Church in Lexington, Kentucky. The candidate must have at least a Bachelor degree with (3) years of experience working with youth and/or young adults. A complete job description is attached and enclosed for your review.

For immediate consideration, suitable applicants should direct questions, cover letter, salary history, three references, resume, and a brief essay describing your journey in the Christian faith and why you are interested in this position to:

Rev. Richard Gaines, Senior Pastor
Consolidated Baptist Church
1625 Russell Cave Road
Lexington, Kentucky 40505

Click on the link below for more information:

youthandyoungadultpastor09082016

The 2016 E.K. Bailey Preaching Conference

Carter_BryanI have returned home from this year’s E.K. Bailey Preaching Conference sponsored by the Church he founded, the Concord Church.

I know that several conferences have met the same fate as some conventions – their numbers are down or dwindling. Not the EKBPC. Under the leadership of Rev. Bryan Carter, the enthusiastic and visionary pastor of Concord, EKBPC has not only maintained the elements that were established by Pastor Bailey, it has taken a life of it’s own, as evidenced by over 1,000 Pastors and Ministers in attendance.

Pastor Bailey began the conference when he adopted Expository Preaching and he wanted to share with generations – older and younger – the principles of Expository Preaching and Church Growth. He was influenced heavily by Dr. A. Louis Patterson, Dr. Warren Wiersbe, and others. It was the first African-American Conference that I ever attended that had preachers of all colors in prominent teaching and speaking roles.

Rev. Carter assembled a “Dream Team” this year of speakers. From the time that I hit the doors of the Fairmont Hotel, you could hear the chatter of excitement about the line-up, one described as “one of the best” – (forgive me for leaving titles off) Jerry Carter, Joel Gregory, Steve Lawson, Bryan Carter, Mark Bailey, Philip Pointer, Freddy Clark, Kimberly Alexander, Michael Duduit, Claybon Lea, Jr., Leroy Armstrong, Kenyatta Gilbert, Melvin Von Wade, Sr., Ralph Douglas West, Tara Jenkins, Marcus Cosby, Claude Alexander, L.K. Curry, Scott Lindsay, Delvin Atchison, Charlie Dates, Kerry Wesley, Conway Edwards . . . they ministered to Pastors, Ministers, Spouses, Church Leaders, and Church members.

I appreciated the incredible App that they developed (EKB Preaching Conference) that really rendered useless the printed program. It carried an activity feed, the group and personalized schedule, it even allowed us to “see” who’s at the conference and send messages back and forth, along with adding contacts, and making notes.  You could view the speakers and bio, exhibitors, maps, transportation, a mental health awareness survey, bookstore information . . . all in one app. It was impressive.

This year they embraced Uber, the transportation app, and offered discounts on this non-taxi-cab service. I didn’t stay at the host hotel (it was sold out). I stayed at the Hilton Anatole, about 5 miles away and took Uber between the venue and my hotel. It saved me a lot of money – the average ride was just $5 one way, about the cost of a tip had I driven my car, not counting parking fees. I literally walked outside, used the Uber app, and was on my way in about five minutes.

Of course, Dallas is a city that is hurting from the recent news events. Pastor Carter became a voice of peace, reason and reconciliation and it became the class that was not listed in the program. He was able to help his community (with the help of his fantastic staff and volunteers) and he suspended the Conference program so that we could view the Memorial Service for the Dallas Officers featuring Presidents George Bush and Barack Obama. We sat in that room, eating a non-scheduled lunch that the Conference provided, and we watched the Dallas services. Thank you Pastor Carter.

I hope that many reading this will consider coming to the Conference in 2017. A few things:

a) If you’re coming to buy new suits and clothing – you won’t find it here. All of the vendors are word-related so there are no clothing stores, no midnight madness sales. It’s all about the business of the Word. Also, there are few conferences where you don’t see “entourages” around preachers who have contributed so much to Christendom, and you can stop and chat with them in the hallway, or engage them in conversation over a meal.

b) If you’re coming to show off your clothes rack, I strongly advise against it. Fortunately, most of us wore casual outfits all week. It’s more of an academic atmosphere and not an opportunity to individually show off. I didn’t see one eight button suits the entire week (smile). And remember, it’s Dallas. The temperatures were around 95-100 degrees each day.

c) Be open in heart and mind. One thing that helped me this year was to come there with an open heart and mind – and it gave vent to the Holy Spirit to speak to me, challenge me, and confirm some things. There aren’t many conferences you can say that literally had speakers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s . . . and even in their 90s.

d) Register early. It’s just $199 for early bird registration. $305 if you wait until the 2017 conference.

Kudos Dr. Carter and Concord. The legacy continues . . . Lord willing, I’ll be there in 2017.

Vacant Pulpit: Fairlawn Baptist Church, Parkersburg, WV (Deadline: September 9, 2016)

Fairlawn Baptist Church, located in Parkersburg, WV, is prayerfully seeking the man God intends to place in our church. We are searching for a man who has a superb prayer life and desires to work with like-minded Christians to do whatever it takes to reach one more soul for Christ. This man should be well versed and support the Baptist Faith and Message. The Senior Pastor of Fairlawn Baptist Church should be a Christ-like man and able to lead a congregation through God’s word. As Senior Pastor, you would be responsible for preaching/teaching, leadership of the church, and developing meaningful relationships with church members and those in the community. We are looking for someone who will be devoted to prayer and make evangelism and discipleship a priority for our ministry. 

Qualified applicants should possess a seminary degree with at least five years of experience as Senior Pastor. Salary will be based upon applicants qualifications. Salary will be determined upon qualifications.

Our church began as a bible study in 1969 and in 1970 began the tremendous journey going forward as Fairlawn Baptist Church. The Church has grown from those four bible study members to approximately 250 active members. Our Church focuses on small groups as this is where relationships can grow and develop. We are always looking for ways to reach out in the community and show the love of Christ to others.

Application deadline is September 9, 2016.

Applications may be sent via email to fbcpsc16@gmail.com
Applications by mail should be addressed to Fairlawn Baptist Church 14 S. Lake Dr. Parkersburg, WV 26101

Homegoing of a Saint: Pastor John W. Smoke, Wetumpka, AL

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Vacant Pulpit: Shiloh Baptist Church, Dayton, OH (Deadline: August 15, 2016)

Please see the attached announcement below:

Shiloh BC Dayton

Vacant Pulpit: New Calvary Baptist Church, Detroit, MI (deadline: October 31, 2016)

NewCalvaryDetroit_Page_1NewCalvaryDetroit_Page_2

Vacant Pulpit: Mount Zion Baptist Church, Steubenville, OH (Deadline: June 30, 2016)

The Mt. Zion Baptist Church of Steubenville, OH is prayerfully seeking a pastor. The pastor will be a man called of God and set apart for the Gospel ministry in according with the Baptist faith. He will also be committed to living and serving in a manner consistent with the standard set forth in Scripture of such a leader. The pastor will be called by the Holy Spirit and confirmed by the body of believers through ordination (Acts 20:28; Titus 1:5; 1 Timothy 3:1).

Please submit the following by June 30, 2016:

– Recent color photo.
– Cover letter and resume with detailed listing of ministerial and pastoral experience and accomplishments.
– Official copies of diplomas, degrees, ministerial license, and ordination certificate.
– Four recommendation letters (two from a pastor, one layperson, and one personal).
– Recent copy of a sermon on CD or DVD.

Submission and Contact Information
Mt. Zion Baptist Church Personal Search Committee
221 North 7th Street
Steubenville, Ohio 43952
Email: montyzion@yahoo.com

Homegoing Services for Dr. E. Edward Jones, Sr.

Information reported by Galilee Baptist Church offices, Shreveport, LA:

EEJones

Homegoing of a Saint – Dr. E. Edward Jones, Sr.

10745927_gby Robert Earl Houston

Dr. E. Edward Jones, Sr., who was affectionately called “The Tall Angel,” who dynamically and fearlessly led the National Baptist Convention of America, Incorporated, International, went home to be with the Lord today, June 9, 2016 in Shreveport, Louisiana. Dr. Jones was 85 years old.

Dr. Jones was born in born in DeRidder, Louisiana in 1931 to Rev. David Jesse and Daisy Jones. His father pastored two church in Louisiana and his mother was a homemaker. He attended Grambling State University. At Grambling he met and later married his beloved Leslie M. Alexander, who were classmates who dated during his junior year and married in August 1952. The Joneses had four children: sons Deryl N. Jones and E. Edward Jones II and daughters Carolyn N. Jones-Haygood and Donna N. Jones-Hassan. They also have nine grandchildren.He received his B.S. in Elementary Education from Grambling; and his B.A. in Religion and Philosophy from Bishop College in Dallas, TX in 1961.

In December 1959, he was called to the pulpit of Galilee Baptist Church in Shreveport. He filed a lawsuit to allow his daughter to attend a then all white school and as a result of his lawsuit, the public schools were desegregated. He would become a leader in the Civil Rights Movement and hosted Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on several occasions.

Under his leadership, Galilee Baptist Church became a powerhouse socially and denominationally. He led Galilee into construction of not only a sprawling church edifice, but housing for residents, and purchased several buildings and developed them as well, including the home of the NBCAI. He was president of both Galilee Majestic Arms, Inc. and Galilee Eden Gardens, Inc.

A very gifted preacher. Dr. Jones literally travelled the world preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ. He became a fixture at the NBCAI in regular sessions and late night preaching. Dr. Jones became Vice President under the leadership of President James Carl Sams of Jacksonville, Florida. He hosted the convention in several settings and after the President and two Vice Presidents died, he became President of the NBCAI in the year that he also served as host pastor.

Under his leadership, he created the CAP Program (Covenant Action Partners) to involve member churches financially to undergird the work of the Convention, which led to financial support for the Boards of the Convention. He presided during a stormy period of the Convention’s history, which led to the creation of the Convention-led Congress and NBCA Publishing House, which created curriculum for use by the member churches. He reorganized several auxiliaries and created a Headquarters Office and staff that the Convention had never seen before. The Convention became a unified body under the leadership of President Jones, whose influence continued even after he stepped down as President after serving from 1985 to 2003. The Convention established a school in Africa, in his honor.

Dr. Jones was a lifelong member of the NAACP, Alpha Phi Alpha; Served on the Governor’s Commission on Race Relations and Civil Rights; Board Member, Baptist World Alliance; Board Member, Louisiana State University Board of Supervisors; Grambling State University Foundation Board Member.

He was named by Ebony magazine as one of 100 most influential black Americans, 1986-2003; Alpha Phi Alpha, National Award for Outstanding Service, 1986; Grambling State University Hall of Fame, 1986; Northwest Louisiana Hall of Fame, 1992; awarded numerous honorary degrees.

Viewed as a man with a vision, Jones’s passion for helping people is evident by his astounding accomplishments. Surrounding his church in Shreveport is a small city of apartments and buildings known as Galilee City, a partial fulfillment of his dream. Beginning in 1985 and 1990, through Galilee Baptist Church, Jones secured funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), for two supportive housing developments for the elderly and handicapped called Galilee Majestic Arms and Galilee Gardens. His next project, one that was spawned within him early in his career as a schoolteacher, was a recreational complex for youth that included sports facilities, a computer lab, and an educational program. His faith-based initiatives didn’t end there, however. Jones saw further needs within his community, and took further steps towards meeting those needs.

In 2004 Jones secured further funding from the City of Shreveport, Bank One, Fannie Mae, HUD, and the Louisiana Housing Finance Agency to build a 76-unit apartment complex for low-and middle-income working residents called Galilee City Apartments. This partnership not only helped to renew a run-down neighborhood, but also provided quality housing for the disadvantaged. “It’s exciting when our financial resources make a significant difference for working families,” said Steve Walker, president of Bank One in Shreveport. All of the buildings, along with the church, a health center, and some of the NBCA offices, cover approximately 31 acres of the Galilee Baptist property. “Ministers are trumpeters for the message of change. Housing and health are two areas where the black community is most hurting,” Jones told Dana DiFilippo in the Cincinnati Enquirer.

To a generation of preachers, Dr. Jones was the role model. He was an unabashed manuscript preacher with articulation, color and imagination. Many of us remember him preaching and pulling on those suspenders and closing his sermons. He was not only an important man, but he never considered himself too important where he couldn’t fellowship. He would be seen in fellowship in the hallways, speaking with old friends of decades and making new friends of young preachers across the country.

In the 1970s, he was the guest of Dr. O.B. Williams and the General Baptist Convention of the Northwest. We were tremendously blessed by his preaching and I had the privilege of being at the tables, selling his manuscripts. Dr. Jones walked up to the table, introduced himself to us (I was a teenager then) and gave me a free copy of the manuscript, “A Bridge Over Troubled Waters.” I would see him on several occasions throughout the years and he never forgot my name or who I was or where I was from. “Robert Earl, how you doing?”

He was not just a leader of a denominational body. He was a student and teacher of the church. We learned how to dress like Dr. Jones. We learned how to stand over the pulpit and yet be communicative and relevant to our congregations like Dr. Jones. He was a singer. He was a musician. He was writer. He was a developer. He was an activist.

Most of all, he was a friend of preachers. We have lost a friend this day.

Biographical information from: Encyclopedia.com.

THE WIRE

by Pastor Robert Earl Houston

H.B. Charles Jr.

About life, preaching, church, books, and other stuff.